Junior Witter seems to be getting ahead of himself by looking for a unification fight against World Boxing Association light welterweight champion Amir Khan. Witter, 35, has a big fight this Saturday night against undefeated Devon Alexander (18-0, 11 KO’s) for the vacant WBO light welterweight in Rancho Mirage, California.
This is a fight that many boxing experts feel that Witter will be in over his head and are predicting that he’ll lose to the young 22-year-old Alexander. However, Witter remains confident that he’ll be able to recapture his WBC title, which he lost only a year ago in a disappointing 12 round split decision to Timothy Bradley in May 2008. The loss interrupted an impressive 21 fight winning streak that Witter had dating back to his 12 round decision loss to Zab Judah eight long years ago in June 2000.

Witter feels that Khan, 22, probably won’t want to fight him, and thinks he may end up avoiding a fight with him in the same manner that Ricky Hatton did for years. However, if Khan does fight him, Witter is predicting that he’ll knock Khan out within three rounds. Witter isn’t too impressed with Khan’s skills, and in fact sees Alexander as the better opponent. If Witter does end up beating Alexander on Saturday night, it would potentially leave Witter in a good position for a unification fight with either Khan or WBO light welterweight champion Bradley.

Khan would be the better option because of his greater popularity, though. This is a fight that would also be a good fight for Khan, because Witter doesn’t punch as hard as some of the other light welterweights in the division like Bradley and Marcos Maidana, and this is a fight that Khan could potentially do well in.

Khan defeated Andriy Kotelnik on July 18th to capture the WBA light welterweight title. The win was an important one because Khan had been beaten by Breidis Prescott in a 1st round stoppage last year and many boxing fans felt that Khan was finished as a fighter. However, Khan stepped it up and proved a lot of people wrong by easily defeating Kotelnik by a wide 12 round decision at the M.E.N. Arena, in Manchester.

Witter grudgingly gave Khan some praise for beating Kotelnik, saying that Khan “did what he had to do” to get the win. However, “Kotelnik didn’t show up,” Witter said. Khan fought the perfect fight against Kotelnik, taking advantage of his poor movement by circling around him and hitting him with jabs and fast punches. It didn’t seem to be a case of Kotelnik not showing up, but rather Khan not letting him do the things that he wanted to do by refusing to be a stationary target for the Ukrainian to get his punches off.

Witter had problems against Kotelnik four years ago, beating him by a close 12 round decision on two of the judges’ cards and a wide one on the other. It was a close fight and Witter seemed to make a lot of mistakes against Kotelnik by standing in front of him for too long of a time.

Witter isn’t worried about Khan’s power, pointing out that Amir landed a lot of shots against Kotelnik but wasn’t able to hurt him. What Witter seems to be forgetting is that Khan wasn’t sitting down on his shots and was fighting mostly a defensive fight by moving, focusing on blocking punches and using his jab. Khan wasn’t putting a lot of power into his shots like he used to do in the past. By William Mackay