Carl Dilks failed in his bid to become the Commonwealth Super Middleweight champion at the York Hall tonight, when he was out-pointed by Ghanaian Charles Dilks in what was a shocking controversial split decision. The judges scored the fight 116-113, 113-115 and 115-114 in favour of the Ghanaian

How Dilks lost the fight I don’t know, he certainly deserved to win, landing the more telling punches, but Adamu’s volume of punches seemed to have swayed the judges, even though most of his shots fell short, and he never troubled Dilks during the fight.

Boxing behind a stiff jab and taking the centre of the ring early, Dilks‘ accurate punches surely won him the majority of the opening rounds.

Although Adamu was throwing plenty of punches, but they were often lunging affairs and he was just never able to get in punching range, with most of his punches falling short, as Dilks landed the more eye catching shots.

Dilks who had never been beyond six rounds, stayed busier throughout, without really hurting a tough Adamu, who by the 7th round started to look like the years were catching up with the tough African, who took Carl Froch twelve hard rounds.

Adamu tired in the 9th and 10th round and in the 11th Dilks landed a good right hand, to surely only need to stay out of trouble in the last round to claim the title.

Dilks looking in good shape despite only three weeks notice for the fight was in control and going into the final round and looked on course to win.

Dilks in my opinion did win the last round and kept the jab pumping out as Adamu had now seemed to have run out of ideas.

I scored the fight 116 – 112 in favour of a humble Dilks, who took the defeat surprisingly well. Most observers at ringside couldn’t believe the result and the pro Dilks crowd were stunned.

“In the last round, I thought I’d done just enough to win it,” Dilks told Sky Sports. “I thought it was very close going into the last minute – we needed a big round.

“I think I boxed the right fight. Maybe I should have been moving my head a little bit more but I’ve only had three-and-a-half weeks notice and I’ve done 12 rounds.

“I’m only 26 and I can still come again and hopefully try and get a rematch – and hopefully set the record straight next time round.”

It was a good performance from Dilks and he deserves a rematch, this time with more time to train.

On the under card Essex (via Warsaw) Heavyweight Albert Sosnowski beat Italy‘s former champion the experienced Paolo Vidoz to claim the European heavyweight title.

Sosnowski stayed busier throughout the fight, outboxing Vidoz and landing the more meaty punches, winning a twelve round unanimous decision against an old looking Vidoz, who’s better days are well behind him. judges scores were 117-111, 119 -109, 120-108, in favour of the Polish born British citizen Sosnowski.

Vidoz has never lacked bravery and never stopped trying, but Sosnowski kept up his busier work beating the Italian to the punch, putting an end to this his fourth attempt at winning back the crown he used to hold.

Barry Hearn now hopes to match Sosnowski with Audley Harrison, who won the Heavyweight Prize fighter belt last time out, putting him back in the mix.

A fight between the impressive Pole and “A Force” would be an interesting fight and would certainly be Harrisons final chance at making the dent in World boxing, that he has been promising us since turning pro in a blaze of glory after winning the Olympic Gold medal.

Harrison now 38 years old, is convinced he can still become world heavyweight champion. And the big southpaw who is currently 26-4(19) feels if he were to win the European title it would be a springboard to world honours.

“I’m ticking over in Los Angeles and can’t wait to get going again,” Audley said. “A European title fight is a quick route back and that is something I am keen to talk about with promoter Barry Hearn. I want to do whatever gets me to a world title the quickest way possible.”

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