David Haye enters 2011 with two missions, Klitschko and Klitschko, the brothers Wladimir and Vitali his fellow heavyweight champions and the men standing in the way of him claiming the undisputed heavyweight championship of the world and British boxing nobility.

Haye who’s popularity is getting bigger every week, has been making many tv appearances over the holidays, and is always forthright to express his views on his goals and determination in accomplishing his heavyweight legacy. 

It’s all about 2011, unifying the titles and becoming heavyweight champion of the world. It’s a big target, but I’m going to do it.” David Haye.

Asked by TV show host Chris Evan’s, on how he deals with pain, in the most painful sport of all, Haye said he made ‘Pain his friend.’

“It is something you get accustomed to over the years, Ive been competing since I was ten, so I’ve adjusted, I’m at one with pain, pain is my friend.” Haye added.


Haye, who plans to retire from boxing this October 2011, must get a move on if he is to realise his fate, that he believes is written for him. Negotiations for the clash with Wladimir are apparently in a good place. We reported last week that the only thing left to arrange was the date and venue of the fight, which could prove to be the largest grossing fight in history.

So all going according to plan, Haye retires after defeating both brothers as undisputed champion, and that’s where it beggars the question? Should Haye bow out there? By Chris Maylett.

British Boxers correspondent and www.worldboxingnews.net editor Phil D. Jay. Believes Haye will beat both the Klitschko’s and the CONTINUE fighting has the undisputed king, believing the lure of the ring and Haye’s competitive instincts will see him in 2012 defending his titles.

Holding all four titles would make them impossible to give up.” – Phil D. Jay WBN

As a possible three-belt heavyweight title bout draws ever nearer, WBA champion David Haye is closer than ever to fulfilling what believes is his destiny, beating both Wladimir and Vitali Klitschko, cleaning up the division and then retiring before his 31st birthday.

In the process, Haye would become the first man in history to hold all four major heavyweight titles and I personally don’t think it will be as easy as the “Hayemaker” thinks to just give them up because of the principles of a promise.

Haye, 30, promised his mother years ago that he would get out of the fight game with all his faculties in tact and gave a date of October 2011, which is when the former undisputed cruiserweight champion turns 31. He has reiterated his desire to keep this promise, whatever the outcome against the Ukrainian super-powers.

The prestige and glory that will come with a double victory, first over IBF and WBO title holder Wladimir, when the pair meet in Europe this spring and then over WBC champion Vitali in the late summer, will far out-weigh any thoughts of retirement for me.

I just cant imagine a man waiting all his life, as he has talked about, to win the heavyweight title and then going on to hold all four belts, then just walking away from the sport and handing them straight back, probably to the men he won them off.

At 31, Haye will be a relatively young man in boxing and could dominate the heavyweight scene for at least five years and still get out with his movie star looks, as the Bermondsey man doesn’t get hit often enough to create any lasting damage.

An announcement will be made shortly to confirm the bout with Wladimir and in my mind, I can envisage Haye using his speed and power to overcome the two brothers in a blockbuster year for the Londoner and firmly believe he will still be boxing this time next year as unified champion.

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