3rd March 2012 


Former WBO featherweight champion Scott Harrison will make his long awaited return to the ring this month when he has his first fight in six years at Blackpool’s Winter Gardens on March 31. 

Insisting he has a lot of time to make up, the 34-year-old hasn’t fought since he successfully defended his title against Australia’s Nedal Hussein on November 5, 2005. Since that fight at the Braehead Arena in his home City of Glasgow. Harrison had personal issues to deal with. A struggle with depression and the pressure to make the weight at 126lbs (featherweight limit) saw his career and life spiral out of control.

You’ve got to remember that I’ve seen the good side of
life and the bad side of life and, when you lose everything, there’s a
hunger there to get it all back. – I also want to concrete my legacy in the sport and I believe that winning world titles will cement that.”
– Former world featherweight champion Scott Harrison.

A cocktail of Drink and drugs were the catalyst to many of his demons and fuelled a period of his life that he wants to put firmly behind him on his quest to become a three weight world champion at super featherweight and then step upto lightweight.

During the Bellshill born boxers five years incarceration from the sport, he spent three of them in a Spanish prison, for among other offences, car theft and assaulting police officers. But now after hitting the rock at the bottom, Harrison is ready to put his past misdemeanours behind him, he says he feels like a new person and believes he will get his opportunity at redemption and the chance to concrete his legacy in boxing.

Harrison who regained his boxing licence in December from the BBBofC says age and layoff wont be a problem for him and that he take inspiration from boxers who have gone before him and boxed way past their 30’s and with Harrison saying he has kept himself in good shape, he hopes to hit the canvas running saying he feels better as a 30 something than he did in his 20’s!

“I spent three years in prison but I was always training and I’ve never been out of the gym since I was released,” said Harrison.

“I’m feeling good and I can’t wait until 31 March because I’ve got a lot of lost time to make up for.

“My plan is to win the world title at super-featherweight in September and then move up to lightweight and win that one. It’ll probably be the WBO title I go for but if there’s a chance to challenge any of the other champions I’ll take that.

“My first fight will be in Blackpool over eight or ten rounds and then I’ll be back in action in May and June to get myself ready for the world title fight. Hopefully, I can fight in Glasgow again.”

“I take a lot of inspiration from people like Foreman and Ali,” said Harrison. “Then you have Juan Manuel Marquez and Bernard Hopkins, both still brilliant at 38 and 47 respectively.

“They’re even better now than they were in their 20s. So is Shane Mosley. I don’t believe that fighters are finished when they reach 30. I feel better now than I did when I was in my 20s.

“It’s going to be a miracle when I win the world title. It’s a hard task when you think about it but fighting’s in my blood.

“Am I a better fighter now? I don’t know about that but I feel a lot fitter and I’ve been better in sparring but you don’t know until you climb into that ring.

“But I’m sharp and I’m also very hungry. You’ve got to remember that I’ve seen the good side of life and the bad side of life and, when you lose everything, there’s a hunger there to get it all back.

“I want all that stuff now even more than I did when I started out as a professional fighter at 18 years old. I want this badly and I don’t want to see the bad side again.

“That’s why I’m boxing. I’ve got three kids to provide for and if I don’t fight then I don’t earn. This is my trade.

“I also want to concrete my legacy in the sport and I believe that winning world titles will cement that.” added Harrison.