Boxing at the moment reminds me of an out of control bus, full of passenger’s with no one at the wheel! None of us know or have any control of where it’s heading or what will become! But if someone doesn’t grab the wheel soon, we are heading for a crash and there will be casualties, and a damaged bus!

When I say we, I mean the boxers, the fans, promoters, managers, trainers and any other person’s involved in the sport. The cogs that keep boxing going, who believe in it, defend and protect it, write about it, talk about it, support and revel in it and ultimately live off it!

Boxing will always need to be defended from a moral perspective, some folk will never accept two human beings inflicting pain on each other for the amusement of a paying baying crowd. And yes tragic accidents have accured adding weight to the anti boxing’s fraternities arguments. But boxing has given generations of people more pleasure than pain and other sports have a much higher percentage of tragic accidents and fatalities than boxing. It doesnt make it right, but it probably isnt a good idea to speed around a track on a motorbike or racing car at break neck speeds etc. An ideal world it isnt, but in it, boxing has turned around and enanced many more lives than it has ruined. But this is a debate reserved for a totally different day.

Boxing is here to stay for the foreseeable future and I’m sure in everyones lifetime who is reading these words. Unfortunatly it isnt the Anti boxing league who are knocking the sports principles and questioning it’s future, it isnt them who have any power over the decline of the sport, no they dont need to, boxing is self harming from the inside!
Yes your right, it was never perfect, from the days when we were driven by the mob and some deserving fighters never got a shots at world titles, because they were not conected or played along to a certain tunes. Since the early days and the introduction of more governing bodies and titles, boxers were given more chance to make a name, win a world title and earn more than there predersessors would have done. But what the titles did was dilute and fragment boxing, the days of one world champion in each weight division, that everyone knew was replace by two, then three, four five and so on.